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Before my next stop, a surprise leak in the trailer had to be dealt with.   Water dripping outside the trailer was what I saw when I reached my brother’s.  Darn.  I dealt with it by draining the water tank and released the pressure from the water system.  I grabbed a beer and decided to ignore the problem, I could deal with it later.  Today was late, and I had to deal with the problem.

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Everything in the back of the trailer thrown up front

Looking under the back bed, there was a bit of water, a place to start the search for the leak.  Everything from the back got piled in the front as my brother and I started the search looking for the leak.  Tools were found and the back bed base was removed.  We tested the cold water pressure lines, then the hot water – no water was spraying.  Next my brother leaned in close to watch as I filled the tank.  After a quick scream to turn the water off – I knew the leak was found.  My brother got sprayed, but he will dry out.  The fill hose connecting the outside fill spout to the water tank had jarred loose.  An easy fix.  A new hose was purchased and everything was put back in its place.  Now on to the Owyhee’s.

Almost everyone that I mentioned the Owyhees to didn’t know where they are.

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The area I call the Owyhees

After getting supplies in Ontario, I headed south to the Succor Creek Road. The Owyhee view was what I was looking for.

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I arrived at the Succor Creek campground and thought I might be the only camper there on a Monday in October. My surprise, there were other campers there. I found a nice spot by a big tree with a picnic table and there was still plenty of room between campers. It was somewhat close to the road but the road was quiet with few traveler, so all was good.

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Succor Creek campground

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View of campground from the south

I learned that it was hunting season and Chukars were the target. Hunting had been so-so. One group got 22 one day and only 2 the next day when the weather turned cold and windy. Most everyone had a hunting dog with them, which put a smile on my face. I had trained my Sadie to be a hunting dog; I don’t hunt, the training was a hobby. When she ran well, taking a straight line to the retrieve or when she ran a blind and took all the signals, it was satisfying and fun. I’m sure some of the dogs were well trained and were the pride of their owner.

My first night camping. Life is good.

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Morning view from the campground

The Facts

  • Everywhere on the internet the information on the Succor Creek campground indicates that the east side of the creek is for tents only. There was no sign indicating this at the campground. The bridge is sturdy and RVs were on the east side.
  • The geology of the are is interesting. If you want to read more about the area you might like to read and drive a geology field trip in Oregon Geology (file: OGv59n01).
  • If you prefer solitude verses campground living, I didn’t see a lot of options. About 4 miles north of the campground the creek bend eastward. There is a road that goes east. I saw a camp site about 1/10 mile from the road.
  • The Succor Creek campground is free.